xavier

Unapologetic Bitches
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xavier last won the day on May 17 2015

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About xavier

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  1. xavier

    I’m from the USA and think it would have been stronger if the video was done in order of sequence, not backwards. And let the song build then a shoot out. But love the message
  2. xavier

    👏👏👏👏
  3. xavier

    When’s the video coming out??
  4. Madonna Cements Herself As A Musical Chameleon With ‘Madame X’  June 22, 2019 by Anthony Cordi  “She is a cha cha instructor, a professor, a head of state, a teacher, a nun,” is how Madonna describes her most recent alter ego covering her latest album, Madame X. In the months anticipating its release, the pop icon teased fans with imagery of the eye-patched emissary, in addition to releasing several collaborations featuring Maluma, Quavo, and Swae Lee. Some reviews deem the pop star’s latest release as a bizarre and rambunctious mixture of sound, when in fact, these things make for an interesting and compelling piece of work. This metamorphosis of sound and image reveals not only that Madonna is still a master of her craft, but that she can continue to captivate audiences with bold creativity. The diversity of Madonna’s discography spans far and wide, ranging from the 1984 classic “Like a Virgin,” to her evolution into modern sound with “Ray of Light.” Throughout these changing eras, the music legend managed to remain at the top of her game, morphing from one persona to the next in an almost seamless way. Her new album is certainly no exception, solidifying Madonna as an ever-evolving songstress with an eye for all things avant-garde.  The singer can add being trilingual to her list of talents, as the album includes songs in English, Portuguese, and Spanish. Influenced predominately from her time living in Lisbon, Portugal, the “Hung Up” belter’s newest release boasts a host of musical influences. Songs like “Faz Gostoso” featuring Anitta and “Medellín” featuring Maluma are testaments to Madge’s rare ability to effectively cross musical genres. Even more noticeable on one her solo tracks, “Crazy,” Madonna exudes a comfortable incorporation of both her personal style and an appreciation for multicultural artistry.  Further embellishing Madame X‘s tinge of musical experimentation, Madonna includes hints of hip hop on the songs “Future” featuring Quavo and “Crave” with Swae Lee. But the album’s prized gems are arguably the dance-floor anthems “God Control” and “I Don’t Search I Find,” which are reminiscent of Confessions on a Dance Floor.    Opening with a somber choir and a call to action advocating for gun control in America, “God Control” gives way to a disco wonderland. “This is your wake up call,” Madonna utters over the sounds of two gunshots and a boogie beat, a seemingly paradoxical juxtaposition. By being able to make us dance to a grim message with a celebratory tone, it is evident that Madame X herself is able to successfully apply her artistry in every facet. According to Billboard, over 90% of Madonna’s 17-show-run in New York is sold out, in addition to Madame X being expected to debut at #1 on the Billboard 200 chart with 90k-100k copies, giving the “Music” singer her first number one since her 2012 anthology, MDNA. If Madame X tells us anything, it’s that Madonna still takes her artistry and legacy seriously. The icon has added yet another acclaimed piece to her body of work that also happens to be one of her most eccentric efforts yet, which in turn, may become her most successful. https://www.popcravenews.com/madonna-cements-herself-as-a-musical-chameleon-with-madame-x/
  5. xavier

    Madame X – Mojo Review Madonna’s 14th studio album fuses political intent with world pop disco. Madonna has always worked well one-to-one, and after her hip trap-inspired singles with Quavo and Swae Lee, and the reggaeton dalliance with Maluma, she has saved the best for last. The real treat on this album is Madonna’s vivid, dramatic work with Mirwais. They send the disco ball spinning on French house tracks like God Control and the very fine I Don’t Search I Find, while Dark Ballet is rococo brilliance, sounding like a deranged Nutcracker Suite. Where 2015’s Rebel Heart seemed like a record made by committee, this album reflects Madonna’s life in Lisbon – laid-back, curious, and intensely creative – absorbing influences ranging from percussive Moroccan gnawa to melancholy Portuguese morna. The pace plods on some mid-tempo tracks, but overall this is a personal, politically-charged mix of dark thoughts and good vibes. Lucy O’Brien 4 out of 5 stars
  6. xavier

    Madame X – Mojo Review Madonna’s 14th studio album fuses political intent with world pop disco. Madonna has always worked well one-to-one, and after her hip trap-inspired singles with Quavo and Swae Lee, and the reggaeton dalliance with Maluma, she has saved the best for last. The real treat on this album is Madonna’s vivid, dramatic work with Mirwais. They send the disco ball spinning on French house tracks like God Control and the very fine I Don’t Search I Find, while Dark Ballet is rococo brilliance, sounding like a deranged Nutcracker Suite. Where 2015’s Rebel Heart seemed like a record made by committee, this album reflects Madonna’s life in Lisbon – laid-back, curious, and intensely creative – absorbing influences ranging from percussive Moroccan gnawa to melancholy Portuguese morna. The pace plods on some mid-tempo tracks, but overall this is a personal, politically-charged mix of dark thoughts and good vibes. Lucy O’Brien 4 out of 5 stars
  7. xavier

    🤔 huh
  8. https://youtu.be/QfKp1tMETLI
  9. xavier

    Album Review: Madonna’s ‘Madame X’ Pushes The Boundaries Of Pop ADVERTISEMENT Mike Wass @mikewassmusic | June 17, 2019 1:39 pm Madame X is a radical body of work, but perhaps not in the way Madonnaintended. She rails against injustice and oppression with the fervor of a preacher, imbuing the album with a righteousness that is palpable. As brave and commendable as that is, the Queen of Pop’s musical missives lack nuance. Rather, it’s her complete defiance of genre that makes Madame X genuinely groundbreaking. From the promo video that announced the era, we know that Madame X is, among other things, a nun and an equestrian. She can also add sane scientist to her resume. The pop icon concocts a collection of songs that blend reggaeton, dancehall, pop, hip-hop, afrobeat and fado — all without losing sight of her mission. As the living legend knows better than most, music makes the people come together. And she’s determined to forge unity and resistance, one pop-hybrid at a time. In some ways, Madame X can be divided into two parts. In one column, there are the wildly experimental, often politically-charged anthems produced by Mirwais. In the other, we’re treated to more accessible pop offerings largely crafted by Mike Dean and Billboard. They are both equally compelling, but the former has proven to be more polarizing. Which, I suspect, would please Madonna no end. After all, her track record with Mirwais is as eclectic as it is immaculate. Together, they have created everything from radio hits to electro-pop oddities like “Impressive Instant” and “X-Static Process.” The collaborators obviously share a passion for stretching the boundaries of pop, and that trend continues on Madame X. Take the album’s lead single. “Medellín,”a dreamy duet with Maluma, was met with mild confusion upon release. (Few expected Madonna to return with a five-minute, bilingual bop about a Colombian city). Amusingly, it turns out to be one of the record’s most accessible cuts. The track’s quirks are offset by a plethora of hooks and an unabashed romanticism that is disarming. A more daring, equally successful experiment is “God Control.” An instant fan favorite, this might be the only song in existence that addresses gun control and youth unemployment over disco beats. It’s sprawling and perhaps unnecessarily baroque, but it burns with ambitious and anger. And still manages to be pop. A quality that “Dark Ballet” is lacking. Instead, the oddball anthem offers a little Tchaikovsky, heavily-distorted vocals and a scathing sermon on the state of humanity. It’s a little heavy-handed, but nonetheless mesmerizing. Less successful are cuts like “I Don’t Search I Find” and “Extreme Occident,” which don’t propel Madonna’s moral agenda forward, or work as straightforward pop songs. They do, however, offer a degree of self-reflection, and tell you more about the enduring hitmaker’s relationship with Father Time than that bogus New York Times profile. The same can not be said for “Killers Who Are Partying,” which finds our heroine exclaiming platitudes over an admittedly lovely, fado-inspired arrangement. The intention is as admirable as the execution is ham-fisted. Mirwais and Madonna truly excel, however, when they are showcasing another aspect of Madame X. Namely, that she is a student and world traveller. “Batuka” is a plea for change that (successfully) combines a choir, African instruments and a Portuguese drum collective. It’s dynamic and utterly compelling. That description also applies to bonus tracks “Ciao Bella” and “Funana.” The former finds Madonna at her most playful and fun, while the latter is a rush of pure energy. There are a couple of frivolous, world music-inspired bops on Madame X. Unfortunately, they are hidden on Disc 2 of the deluxe edition. The rest of the album is less experimental, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. “Crave” stood out as the best buzz track from Madame X and it still ranks as the only cut that really caters for radio. The production, courtesy of Mike Dean and Billboard, is on-trend and Swae Lee adds a hip-hop sensibility that makes it accessible to an even wider audience. The producers work similar magic on “Faz Gostoso” featuring Anitta. It’s actually a cover of a 2017 hit by BLAYA, but there’s nothing dated about this explosion of dance beats and sexy lyrics. Another highlight is “Come Alive.” Co-written by Starrah (one of seven songs she contributed to the album), the hip-hop-tinged bop boasts one the most instant choruses on Madame X. The involvement of Jeff Bhasker (Beyonce’s4) is strongly felt on the lush, horns-filled production. He also had a hand in the excellent “Looking For Mercy.” It’s not a coincidence that Madonna introduced Rebel Heart with a song called “Living For Love.” This is a bookend of sorts. Instead of the outward search for companionship, the hitmaker is now focussed on her relationship with God. Wisdom is in short supply in pop music, but this is brimming with it. While there’s an urban sheen to many of the songs not produced by Mirwais, world music is still very much front and center. Take the Latin-pop fusion that is “Crazy.” In another artist’s hands this would be surefire radio fodder, but Madame X makes it a culture-bridging banger. And then, there’s the hilarious “Bitch I’m Loca,” which is best described as a (low-brow) sequel to “Medellín.” I also recommend hunting down “Back That Up To The Beat.” It’s yet another gem tucked away on Disc 2 that mashes everything from euro-dance to ’90s R&B. Pharrell really stepped outside his comfort zone on this one. Again, this half of Madame X falters ever so slightly when it becomes political. Album-closer “I Rise” is well-intentioned, but it didn’t need a children’s choir to bludgeon the point home. “Future,” a dancehall-lite collaboration with Quavo, is no less subtle in its messaging or execution. The latter also highlight’s Madonna’s heavy use of autotune, which begins to feel a little overdone as the record enters the home stretch. It should be noted that while the Queen of Pop addresses the bigger picture like never before on Madame X, she also looks inward. In many ways, Madame X is Madonna’s most personal album to date. She’s speaking her truth, while revealing more of herself than ever. It might not be the collection of bangers you want, but it’s what we, as a society, need. The fact that she can stoke the flames of rebellion in a way that is original, vulnerable and inclusive (in the truest sense of the word) is a pop miracle. But, then again, Madonna has been rewriting the rule book since 1982. And she isn’t going to stop any time soon. Score: 4.5/5
  10. Congtrats To Queen Madonna for new USA #1 Album. Bravo.👏👏👏👏🥂🥂🥂🥂🍾🍾🍾🍾
  11. When is the chart due to come out???
  12. xavier

    YEs when is this video due to arrive
  13. Arriving in nyc Sunday June 16
  14. https://www.npr.org/2019/06/13/731760369/madonna-introduces-madame-x-honesty-is-a-commodity-right-now interview
  15. Any projection at this point about her numbers and streaming