artlover

Rebel Hearts
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About artlover

  • Rank
    Crazy For You

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Worldwide
  • Interests
    Music, Art, Audio Engineering, Poetry, Literature, Songwriting
  • M Fan Since
    2002

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  1. artlover

    I really wish she would leave Interscope or Universal nonetheless. i think this label doesn't do her any justice and it's not fair. She could go back to Warner. She wouldn't need to go back to Sire. Maybe actually under Maverick. The prodigal child'd be back home!
  2. LOL that's so her! I mean, it's "saudade", but she sings it in some kind of ancient portuguese... Quite a beautiful song.
  3. artlover

    Not necessarily a physical resemblance, but Brazilian huge huge huge singer, TV hostess and model Xuxa has been a kind of a trailblazer her own way for over 30 years of stardom. She's always spoken of Madonna as an inspiration and even interviewed her in the late '90s. Now she's in her late 50s and is suffering from a lot of ageism much like M herself. I'm a fan. *She's had a TV show in the US in the past, being mentioned in The Simpsons and Gilmore Girls, but she's widely more famous either in countries like mine (Brazil) or Spanish-speaking ones like Argentina or Spain.
  4. I find her remixes quite basic, but it's indeed symbolic of her to win this. I hope we can get this over with.
  5. artlover

    If there's no snippet there's no way to know.
  6. Jay-Z sold a stake of TIDAL back in 2017 (as you can see here: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/23/business/media/tidal-streaming-music-jayz-sprint.html) which puts me in a position where I don't know if Madonna and some of other artists still own theirs. I don't recall her mentioning it recently or at all. Does somebody know of that?
  7. artlover

    I heard Beyoncé went with Jay-Z and they were backstage. I can't confirm though
  8. Do you happen to have Up Down Suite (from some Rain singles) in 24-bit?

    1. Aiwa08

      Aiwa08

      No, I'm sorry. I only have "Up Down Suite" on CD.

    2. artlover

      artlover

      That'd be awesome too! 

  9. artlover

    Do we have the whole concert yet? I didn't get it from comments
  10. artlover

    Too bad this didn't happen.
  11. Madonna Has Always Been a Fighter The icon's close friend and collaborator, Donatella Versace, pays tribute to her many talents. 11.28.2019 by Donatella Versace “They are so naive; they think we are not aware of their crimes. We know, but we are just not ready to act. The storm isn’t in the air, it’s inside of us. I want to tell you about love and loneliness, But it’s getting late now. Can’t you hear outside of your Supreme hoodie, the wind that’s beginning to howl?” Thus ends the song "Dark Ballet," the second track on Madonna’s latest album, Madame X. It's a strong, powerful message, which only Madonna is brave enough to unleash on the world. Her social justice activism is matched only by the absolute discipline she applies to her work in the studio and on the stage. And that is how it’s always been. When I was asked to write this introduction, I became reflective. I have known Madonna for many, many years. She has been the star of three Versace advertising campaigns. But more than the celebrity, I have had the rare fortune of getting to know the woman. Of talking to her not only about work, but about life. Because Madonna is extremely informed and culturally aware she can hold her own on any subject from music to art; on politics and our environmental crisis. In her latest album, I have found that same spirit of protest we first saw in her early work. Her only mission then seemed to be to shock the world – whereas her real goal was and has always been to expose things which, as a society, we didn’t have the courage to discuss. That is why she has always been criticized, misunderstood, minimized, and at times, vilified. Her reaction was to crucify herself voluntarily. During the Confessions on a Dance Floor tour, there was a really powerful moment when she enters the scene on an enormous cross, wearing a crown of thorns, to sing "Live To Tell." Her beauty is—and excuse the word-play—divine. Everyone saw Madonna on the cross as another one of her “provocations”—because the intelligentsia have never taken her seriously. A woman who dares to lift her head up and say what she thinks? To expose the rot we are all trying to hide? No one noticed that, in reality, the message she sought to convey was a much different one. When the count on the screens stops, the information, which leaves you breathless—like a punch in the stomach—begins to appear. It’s the number of children who would soon die from AIDS if society didn’t do something to help them, not just with medicine, but through prevention, research, education, and discussion. In reality, we were all crucified, yet many of us hadn’t realized it yet. Madame X really struck a chord with me. I listen to lots of music, especially music that experiments with sound. In this album, I not only found experimentation, but also powerful, relevant lyrics. I found a Madonna uninterested in currying favor. I found the Madonna of Like a Prayer and of American Life—perhaps one of her least understood albums. Not long ago, Like a Prayer turned thirty years old. I can still remember the scent when I opened the CD sleeve. Despite the cultural stigma of AIDS, the record was accompanied by lyrics that focused on the epidemic that was claiming so many victims and on the importance of global education about a monumental health crisis that would touch all of society, and which above all required compassion and empathy for those infected. The day after the launch of the video, religious groups all over the world protested against the use of Catholic imagery, and even the Pope went out of his way to ask “fans” to boycott the disk. Both tracks went straight to number one on the charts and sold over 15 million copies. The album became a manifesto for the battle against those who want to keep us ignorant and oppressed, against stereotypes, against all those who want a society trapped by bigoted and ignorant preconceptions. That is what Madonna has always been to me: A lioness. A fighter. Besides the records sold, besides her ability to interpret society like no other artist, to create fashions that have inspired us all; besides the countless records made and awards won, Madonna to me, more than a fantastic performer and the female artist who has sold the most records in the history of music (well, yes...), is a woman. A mother, a great businesswoman, one who began marketing before the word or even the discipline had been invented, and who has always challenged us to be a more cohesive society, to fight together against injustice and to respect our neighbor. I admire Madonna’s fearlessness. She has never been afraid to go out on a limb. In concert, always, she asks the crowd: How many people talk the talk and how many walk the walk? She even did it physically in her controversial book Sex—another ground-breaking, record-breaking project which can only be found today second- or third-hand. She accomplished this radical artistic and cultural statement by laying her ideas bare. The day before the American elections in 2016, on a cold late-fall evening in New York, she made a surprise performance in Washington Square Park before hundreds of people who quickly gathered around her. She appeared with just a guitar and her desire to keep on believing. After the terrorist attacks in Paris the year before, she had done the very same thing. With a lexicon of words that fail to adequately describe her, I return to one: brave. While a song cannot give us back what we have lost; it can definitely help and support those in need. And there she was again, with her face and her body to say: I am here in person, and not just with words. She even did it physically in her controversial book Sex—another ground-breaking, record-breaking project which can only be found today second- or third-hand. She accomplished this radical artistic and cultural statement by laying her ideas bare. The day before the American elections in 2016, on a cold late-fall evening in New York, she made a surprise performance in Washington Square Park before hundreds of people who quickly gathered around her. She appeared with just a guitar and her desire to keep on believing. After the terrorist attacks in Paris the year before, she had done the very same thing. With a lexicon of words that fail to adequately describe her, I return to one: brave. While a song cannot give us back what we have lost; it can definitely help and support those in need. And there she was again, with her face and her body to say: I am here in person, and not just with words. Source: https://www.lofficielusa.com/music/madonna-donatella-versace-tribute
  12. I feel Mirwais is as guilt as Madonna here. She'd probably heard this demo at some point. It's hard to live as an artist if you're not a celebrity or doesn't have a very profitable deal. Madonna has so much money that she could give him a little and it wouldn't itch her at all. I hope they can get a fair settlement with his name on the liner notes.
  13. I saw this online and was wondering what's real here. I guess some are fan edits:
  14. The album was a great surprise to me, specially after the mess that was Rebel Heart which made me like less than half of it. Madame X brings me back to what I've ever enjoyed the most about Madonna. It urged me to look forward to an entire record, which doesn't happen very often these days. I was positively surprised by the fact that, even with all global influences it does not go messy as its predecessor, even in the weakest songs like "B*tch, I'm Loca". Madonna is alive and in full force. Or quite.